Ronchi Lab

Host-microbiota Interactions

Prof. Dr. Francesca Ronchi
Prof. Dr. Francesca Ronchi
PI Host-Microbiota Interactions

francesca.ronchi(at)charite.de

PROJECT

Over the past decade, it has become clear that the intestinal microbiota can affect host metabolism and systemic immune cell responses also in distal organs, such as the Central Nervous System (CNS), through the dissemination of bacterial products or metabolites, which strongly depend on the substrates available through dietary intake. Nutrition became a complementary, alternative and successful approach in the management of metabolic and neurological conditions. However, for this to be effective for many more patients we lack an adequate understanding of the exact mechanisms involved in the diet-intestinal microbiota-mediated CNS effects.

We and others showed that bacteria and diets influence the host immune response, however how exactly the diet-microbiota interplay can affect the functions of the immune cells residing and homing to the CNS, during healthy and inflammatory conditions, remains poorly understood.

Our lab aims to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of how diets affect the composition and function of the gut microbiota and, subsequently, the CNS functions under healthy and neurological disease conditions, such as multiple sclerosis, refractory epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease. To address our goals we combine state-of-the-art next generation ‘OMICs techniques and gnotobiology techniques in animal models.

We are also interested in studying the microbiota role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and how innate immune pathways, such as inflammasome, contribute to intestinal homeostasis and during intestinal inflammation.


LAB MEMBERS

Andrina Rutsch
Andrina Rutsch
PhD student
Johan Kantsjö
Johan Kantsjö
PhD student


PUBLICATIONS  

https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=8Zr57sQAAAAJ&hl=en

  1. Rutsch A, Kantsjö JB, Ronchi F*. The Gut-Brain-Axis: How Microbiota and Host Inflammasome influence Brain Physiology and Pathology. Frontiers in Immunol., 2020:11,3237. *corresponding author. DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2020.604179
  2. Gil-Cruz C, Perez-Shibayama C, De Martin A, Ronchi F, van der Borght K, Niederer R, Onder L, Lütge M, Novkovic M, Nindl V, Ramos G, Arnoldini M, Slack EMC, Boivin-Jahns V, Jahns R, Wyss M, Mooser C, Lambrecht BN, Maeder MT, Rickli H, Flatz L, Eriksson U, Geuking MB, McCoy KD, Ludewig B. Microbiota-derived peptide mimics drive lethal inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Science, 2019:366(6467):881-886. DOI: 10.1126/science.aav3487
  3. Iannone LF, Preda A, Blottière HM, Clarke G, Albani D, Belcastro V, Carotenuto M, Cattaneo A, Citraro R, Ferraris C, Ronchi F, Luongo G, Santocchi E, Guiducci L, Baldelli P, Iannetti P, Pedersen S, Petretto A, Provasi S, Selmer K, Spalice A, Tagliabue A, Verrotti A, Segata N, Zimmermann J, Minetti C, Mainardi P, Giordano C, Sisodiya S, Zara F, Russo E & Striano P (2019) Microbiota-gut brain axis involvement in neuropsychiatric disorders, Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics, 19:10, 1037-1050, DOI: 10.1080/14737175.2019.1638763
  4. Hebbandi Nanjundappa R*, Ronchi F*, Wang J, Clemente-Casares X, Yamanouchi J, Umeshappa C, Yang Y, Blanco J, Bassolas H, Salas A, Serra P, Slattery RM, Mooser C, Wyss M, Macpherson AJ, McKay DM, McCoy KD**, Santamaria P**. A gut microbial autoantigen mimic that hijacks diabetogenic autoreactivity to suppress colitis. Cell;2017:171(3):655-667.e17. *shared first-authors, ** shared last-authors. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2017.09.022
  5. Mamantopoulos M*, Ronchi F*, Van Hauwermeiren F, Vieira-Silva S, Yilmaz B, Martens L, Saeys Y, Drexler SK, Yazdi AS, Raes J, Lamkanfi M, McCoy KD**, Wullaert A**. Nlrp6- and ASC-dependent inflammasomes do not shape the commensal gut microbiota composition. Immunity;2017:47(2):339-348.e4. *shared first-authors, **shared last-authors. DOI: 10.1016/j.immuni.2017.07.011
  6. Ronchi F*, Basso C*, Preite S, Reboldi A, Baumjohann D, Perlini L, Lanzavecchia A, Sallusto F. Experimental priming of encephalitogenic Th1/Th17 cells requires pertussis toxin-driven IL-1β production by myeloid cells. Nat Commun.;2016:7:11541. *shared first-authors. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms11541